Feminist

feminism
ˈfɛmɪnɪz(ə)m/
noun
  1. the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes.
When I started writing this post it felt like such a big word to use on my blog. After reigning my thoughts in and thinking about it, that word is by no means out of place here. Nonetheless normally my blog is a pretty, happy, neutral place, full of things that provide respite from anything happening politically or socially around the world. Not because I don’t think these issues are important, but because it’s not the main focus of what I want my blog to be about.

Recently I’ve found it hard to ignore signs that feminism is something now more than ever to take notice of, especially at this point in history.  You could say it’s because a certain person, who previously demonstrated an extremely demeaning view of women, has become the leader of the ‘free world’. Subsequently, through his first changes in power, it makes you feel like he’s taking this socially transcendent movement, fifty steps back. But how does this affect me and, why does something that’s happening in the USA make me want to write a post about feminism?

Three things:

1. That ‘free world’ seems to shout the loudest where media is concerned. It’s hard to sit back and ignore something that’s constantly on my twitter, Facebook and Instagram every single day.

2. This media storm has highlighted other gender discrepancies around the world, that also shouldn’t be ignored.

3. It’s something that as a woman I should address. As I’ve come to the realisation that I am 100% a feminist.

At first stereotypical thought, the word feminist brings images of angry women, who hate men and all rigidly believe in exactly the same thing. This couldn’t be further from the truth. The world wide women’s march made me feel all kinds of girl-power proud. A march that came about because (like the stereotype) women were angry that Trump had come into power. However unlike the stereotype, the women who came together were so beautifully diverse in every way. The march was about equality and acceptance. Acceptance that women should be treated as equals in society, but also acceptance that feminism affects and should include everyone.

That’s where I stand with feminism, it’s about saying as a woman, man or child, ‘Hey I’m here for you as an equal person in every way and we’re all waiting for the powers-that-be in society to catch up.’ I personally don’t think it’s about being aggressive; don’t get me wrong you have to be strong, but it’s about being inclusive, supporting other women in their endeavours and showing them whether you’re female or male that they have every right to every opportunity that comes their way.

Consequently, I think we should celebrate other women and their achievements, not bring them down because of our own bitter feelings. Because who are you to judge someone, when you know nothing about how hard they’ve worked to get to that position? Those thoughts have the same connotations with people who think women shouldn’t have equal opportunities in society.

I’m by no means an expert on this topic, these are just thoughts I’ve had spinning around my head for the last few months. It’s also a way of me saying, if you’re another women, lady, girl, out there doing your thing, I support you and that’s regardless of what you think politically, socially or religiously, because at the end of the day we’re all female, which in itself is amazing.

❤️

 

 

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